Posts Tagged ‘Beethoven’

Festive Sides

Friday, August 29th, 2014

By ANDREW POWELL Published: August 29, 2014 MUNICH — Staged works and the legendary Lied evenings hold the limelight here at the annual Opernfestspiele, begun 139 years ago. But veins of chamber music and, since 2008, choral programming run through the five-week schedule, lending scope and affirming organizer Bayerische Staatsoper’s depth of musicianship. The chamber […]

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Arcanto: One Piece at a Time

Friday, January 31st, 2014

By ANDREW POWELL Published: January 31, 2014 MUNICH — The 11-year-old Arcanto Quartet, heard here last Friday (Jan. 24), is everything a chamber group shouldn’t be for promotional purposes. There are no family ties. Their instruments don’t match. They share no doctrine about period practice. They don’t grind out whole cycles of anyone’s music. Not […]

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Tutzing Returns to Brahms

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

By ANDREW POWELL Published: October 16, 2013 MUNICH — Some festivals strive to be on your radar twelve months of the year, with unending publicity. Others revel in a few days. Take the annual Brahms Days in tranquil Tutzing, south of here on Lake Starnberg. Its scale is intimate, its setting gemütlich. Its focus — […]

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Modern Treats, and Andsnes

Sunday, October 6th, 2013

By ANDREW POWELL Published: October 6, 2013 MUNICH — The 1909 candy-box essays by Schönberg and Webern, Fünf Orchesterstücke and Sechs Stücke, can pass by gratuitously in uncommitted hands. Not so yesterday (Oct. 5) in a Munich Philharmonic program pairing them with Beethoven concertos. Norwegian conductor Eivind Gullberg Jensen, calm and assured, drew incisive, expressive […]

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Martha Argerich at the Musikfest

Friday, September 20th, 2013

By Rebecca Schmid The Musikfest, Berlin’s 20th-century music festival, took a welcome occasion to revisit the opus of Lutosławski upon his centenary this year. Following the appearances of guest ensembles such as the Royal Concertgebouw, Philharmonia Orchestra and Bavarian Radio Symphony, the Staatskapelle Berlin performed his Mi-Parti (1976) under Music Director Daniel Barenboim alongside works […]

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Too much of a good thing?

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

By: Frank Cadenhead Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis is a monument of world culture. It is not just a musical masterpiece but an extraordinary gift to our collective humanity. It is like a Michelangelo, a Titian, a Shakespeare play, a poem by Goethe – so utterly astounding that anyone has to wonder how the artist, a mere […]

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New York Rites

Friday, September 21st, 2012

By Rebecca Schmid In Berlin, where contemporary music thrives from the Philharmonie to off spaces, it is a widespread perception that New York’s mainstream institutions are afraid to program anything past Stravinsky. A look at Alan Gilbert’s recent undertakings with the New York Philharmonic, notably in a hugely successful “360” concert of Mozart, Stockhausen, Boulez […]

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Opening words…

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

By Rebecca Schmid The author Karl Scheffler famously described Berlin as condemned to forever becoming but never being. When I arrived here nearly two years ago as a DAAD grantee in journalism, the city sprawled out like an unfinished collage. The Philharmonie on the gleaming, rebuilt Potsdamer Platz where I heard Daniel Barenboim perform and […]

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Finding the Right Gimmick

Wednesday, March 14th, 2012

by Sedgwick Clark Shaham’s 1939 Dark Horse Gil Shaham had an epiphany. After years of recognition as one of the brightest young lights of the concert circuit, the Israeli-American violinist conjured one of the most imaginative programming concepts in years. He had been struck by how many violin concertos written in the 1930s had entered […]

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New York Was His “Howieland”

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

by Sedgwick Clark It’s a most improbable New York story: Broadway salutes a theater critic, of all things, by dimming its lights during prime box-office time prior to curtain. How often has that happened? No one would have been more astonished to receive this honor than its recipient, Howard Kissel, theater critic of the New […]

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