Posts Tagged ‘orchestra’

Can A Union Walk Away With My Contract?

By Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq.     Dear Law and Disorder:  Is it legal that a presenter can put “strike, lock-out or other labor controversy (including, without limitation, the picketing on the theater by representatives of any labor union having or claiming to have jurisdiction over theater’s employees” into a force majeure clause? I mean, […]

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International Touring: A Report From The Front Lines

By Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq. As the U.S. Legal Advisor to the International Artist Managers’ Association (IAMA), I’ve been asked to prepare an update on a variety of current issues involving international touring at the next membership meeting in London on November 27, 2015. Not only do I adore IAMA, but as this would provide […]

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When Is A Plumber Worth More Than A Violinist?

By Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq.    We spent a lot of money making a CD to promote our orchestra. Now the composer’s publisher wants mechanical royalties. I just don’t understand why I have to pay mechanical royalties for a CD I am not selling, just giving to donors. Doesn’t the Composer want people to listen […]

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Replacement Woes

By Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq. Dear Law and Disorder: We are a dance company who is going to perform in March in the United States. We gave the list of names for Visa purposes last September to the venue. Now we have some changes, we have to replace two technicians who are essential for the […]

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When Is A “Work For Hire” Not A “Work For Hire”?

By Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq.    Dear Law and Disorder: An orchestra commissioned one of our artists to make an arrangement of a work for them to perform. We agreed that it would be a “work for hire.” Now, the orchestra wants to record their performance of the arrangement and has come to us asking […]

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Licensing Video For A Tribute Show

By Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq.    Dear Law and Disorder: We are in production of a new “Tribute” show with a video component.  We are grappling with what type of media is public domain or where public domain photos or video can be found.  None of the video production companies seem to have a definitive […]

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The Elephant and The Frog

By Robyn Guilliams      Dear Law & Order I’ve been hearing a lot about a recent U.S. ban on ivory that will prevent string players from transporting their instruments in and out of the country.  However, I recently travelled to Europe and back with my cello (my bow has a small ivory inlay in […]

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Beware of Easy Solutions

By Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq. A conductor we manage has been invited to conduct one of the orchestras of a University in the United States later this year. He has worked there once before when he conducted performances when he had a J-1 visa. On this occasion however due to the short length of the […]

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Too Fast and Furious To Get A Visa!

By Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq.    Dear Law and Disorder: We filed a P-1 petition for an orchestra that is to perform at our venue. The petition was approved and it includes the orchestra’s conductor. However, the conductor just informed us that he does not want to go the consulate and apply for his P-1 […]

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Gosh, That Sounds Familiar!

By Brian Taylor Goldstein, Esq. Dear Law and Disorder: A composer has been commissioned to write an ‘original’ work for a particular soloist or specific chamber ensemble. The commission agreement stipulates that the performing artist is granted exclusivity, giving the artist a certain period of time in which he/she has the sole right to perform […]

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